Can a free dinner lower your energy bills?

Last year, we warned you about a  scam involving free dinner at local restaurants. We’ve heard there may be some other misleading information making the circuit right now. One group sells a “special” type of insulation that claims to significantly lower utility bills. We’ve also heard of a telephone scam claiming that a federal program endorsed by President Obama will supposedly pay your utility bills. There is no such program.

Energy saving products or programs that work sell themselves – CFL lamps, LED light bulbs, smart strips, fiberglass or foam insulation, vehicle plug in timers and the Alaska Home Energy Rebate Program, for example. After all, companies that manufacture these products don’t invite you to free dinners or call you up at home to sell their products or services.

Before you purchase a high-priced energy saving product from a seminar or signing up for a program that sounds too good to be true, please think twice. If you have questions about a product claiming to lower electric usage, feel free to shoot us an email info@gvea.com or post here on the blog. If you do decide to attend one of these free dinners, we would be interested to know what you think.

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